Student voice: Why education is important to Gov. Otter

I’m an aspiring journalist and I got the opportunity to attended Capitol for a Day in my hometown on Sept. 26. I believe Capitol for a Day is an important day for Gov. Butch Otter and his colleagues. Many of the issues that need to be addressed can be fixed at the meeting. I had the opportunity to see this process up close and speak directly with Otter. I believe education in Idaho is important. Sometimes I wonder what will happen in the next year of my education. I had the opportunity to ask Otter questions about my future in education.

What are your thoughts about K-12 education as your perspective as governor? 

“The state of Idaho has a five-year plan. I know what teachers will be doing with education in the next five years. For example, the state knows what new curriculum will come out in the coming years.”

How is education changing in Wilder? 

“Wilder is a farming community. With the changing technology in America, many future farmers need the new technology skills to be successful with their business.”

Can you give me an example of a goal you set for teachers? 

“One goal teachers have is for third grade students to be at reading level. We don’t want those kids to get behind.”

Why is it important for students to graduate?

“When it comes to graduation time, the State of Idaho wants all students to be encouraged to graduate from high school and move on to a skill level or a four-year degree. In my opinion, Idaho is trying its best to have a better education rate and scores for all 290,000 students in 115 school districts statewide. One economic indicator is that there is a 2.8 percent unemployment rate, but many of those people need jobs that require higher education and this is why I’m pushing every student to graduate and move onto college or trade school. This is also why the State of Idaho is funding millions of dollars for education.”

This was a learning experience. I now feel more informed on how education works in my hometown.

Written by Jorge Garcia, an eighth grader at Wilder Middle School.

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