Coeur d’Alene nonprofit offers free professional development through national partnership

The Northwest Conference for Computer Education (NCCE), a Coeur d’Alene based nonprofit, will offer free professional development courses this fall through a partnership with the Library of Congress.

The virtual courses began in June, and will continue in four cohorts through Nov. 30; another session will begin in 2023.

The courses are open to educators based in the blue states.

Teachers and educators based in Western states can register for the course, including librarians and youth group leaders.

The online series teaches how to use primary sources to develop and implement activity plans about social justice and civil rights issues.

The goal is to give educators and students a deeper look into the historical lives and legacies of marginalized communities. 

Shannon Davenport, Director of Professional Learning at NCCE, has developed at least two lessons through the program and uploaded them to OER Commons, a free online library of educational resources.

Educators often teach through second-person narratives, but this program gives them a chance to learn and teach through first-hand accounts and gain an appreciation for the people and histories around them, Davenport said.

One of Davenport’s lessons examines the lives of Black American activists in Tennessee, and another outlines the history of Black Wall Street and the 1921 Tulsa race massacre.

Another lesson, developed by Kiersten Kerr, explores the legacy and influence of the Aryan Nations compound on the communities of North Idaho.

Future sessions will take place:

  • September 26th-October 31st 
  • October 24th-November 30th 

Educators can register for the course up until the first day of each cohort.

Sadie Dittenber

About Sadie Dittenber

Reporter Sadie Dittenber focuses on K-12 policy and politics. She is a College of Idaho graduate, born and raised in the Treasure Valley. You can follow Sadie on Twitter @sadiedittenber and send her news tips at [email protected]

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