National poll: Younger adults are more skeptical about immunizations

Americans generally believe children should be immunized before going to school, according to a national Harvard University poll released Thursday.

However, younger adults are less likely to believe immunizations are safe, and are less likely to believe what public health agencies say about immunizations.

In a poll of 1,550 Americans, 84 percent of respondents said children should be immunized for preventable diseases such as measles, mumps and rubella before they can attend school.

Thirteen percent of respondents said children should be able to attend school without immunizations. And in a separate question, 15 percent of parents said they have delayed child immunizations because of safety concerns.

Only 54 percent of respondents said they believe immunizations are very safe, and only 37 percent said they greatly trust public health agencies to provide accurate information about immunization safety.

Younger adults are even more skeptical. Just 48 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds believe immunizations are very safe, and only 31 percent said they greatly trust information from public health agencies.

The poll was conducted in August and September. For most questions, the margin of error is 3 percent, but some questions have a 4 percent margin of error.

In Idaho, immunization rates dropped in 2018-19, while immunization opt-out rates increased.

 

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